A Cut Above

A Cut Above

Recently the video crew assembled at the shop of JTR Customs in Bloomington, Minnesota. Owned and operated by Jim Lundquist, the shop specializes in cutting and installing glass for classic cars. Jim’s expertise in cutting glass is legendary in these parts so I was excited at the prospect of Jim sharing some of his knowledge with fellow club members.

Over the years that I have known Jim, I have witnessed him personally building nearly a couple dozen classic cars, each one was a work of art, and worthy of praise by his peers in the hobby. Jim started his professional career as a body man for many of the local body shops, although as the years went by he developed a severe sensitivity to the isocyanides used in many auto body paints and products. While he was certainly exposed to these chemicals more often than most hobbyists, his experience should serve as an important lesson to all of us. The need to take your own health seriously starts with protecting yourself from possible risks. An investment in proper ventilation for the shop, fresh air supply air masks, respirators, masks, gloves and protective gear, will pay for itself countless times over again.

After leaving the auto body repair business Jim began a successful career cutting, installing and training other glasscutters. He went on to combine his love of working on cars with his knowledge of glass cutting to open his own business years later. Jim is one of those old-time hot rodders you’re happy to call friend. Watch for his video on glass cutting and installation as well as a few of his time tested tips and tricks. Also check out the awesome 1935 Studebaker Dictator Jim is installing glass into.

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2 Responses to “A Cut Above”
  1. Andy
    Andy

    Sounds very interesting and it is always good to hear a success story like that. I have a glass related question on my 1936 Ford Cabriolet. The regulator for the door glass is missing a spring. It has a dual spring. that is it has what looks like a regular handle crank spring but it actually is two coil springs next to each other connected across the top. Do you know where I can get a dual spring like that. I tried all the normal resources.
    Thanks
    Andy

    Reply
    • Customer Service
      Customer Service

      Hi, Andy. My first two go to places for Old Ford Parts would be: Bob Drake Reproductions: http://www.bobdrake.com

      Dennis Carpenter Reproduction Parts
      http://www.dennis-carpenter.com

      If I turned up empty there, I would reach out to the folks at Little Dearborn Parts in Minneapolis.

      http://www.littledearborn.com

      Their web site, is not the greatest, their catalogs don’t list all of their inventory, but they’ve been around forever and can be very helpful in situations like yours. While they specialize in Ford products, I have bought a variety of miscellaneous parts from them over the years, that fit everything from early MoPars to mid-thirties Chevys. (it may work out best to just give them a call).

      Best of luck with your search, I am certain you will be rewarded with enough persistence.

      Reply