Replacing a Broken Lug Stud on Your Classic Car

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George Vondriska teaches you how to replace a broken lug stud on your classic car with a hammer and a little bit of force.

Discussion
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9 Responses to “Replacing a Broken Lug Stud on Your Classic Car”
  1. Michael Cain

    If a person needs a video to learn how to replace a wheel stud, perhaps he/she should not be allowed near any tools, esp. on a classic car………..

    Reply
  2. David Smith

    He really should back up the drum with a heavy tube while removing and replacing the stud to keep from bending the hub. Just over torquing the lug nuts can distort the hub and drum.I did auto repair for forty five years and and am certified in all aspects of repair

    Reply
  3. Mark

    Next time please wear safety glasses…Yes you may not like them, but prescription glasses are not safety rated unless you don’t care about your eyesight. And in that case keep on doing it the way you did in this video…

    Reply
  4. Tony

    Video should be titled “how NOT to replace a broken wheel stud”. The proper way is with a press, and technically “swedged”. They should NEVER be pounded in with a hammer. That’s a good way to damage, and enlarge the hole, ensuring that the stud will eventually become loose. You have effectively ruined the drum by doing this. Take it to a machine shop, and just pay a few bucks to have it done properly, or invest in a hydraulic press……..for that “one” time in your life, that you’ll need to do this.

    Reply
  5. jim powers

    we did racing and our garage mechanic said to beat it out with a bf hammer, to install put it thru from the back put lug nut on and run the torque wrench until the nut pulls it thru. worked for us.

    Reply
  6. John

    I use a large socket for support in removal and pull the replacement in with a lug nut or nut. This prevents any possible damage to the drum or hub.

    Reply
  7. Mick Levy

    Not true on my 65 Barracuda. You need a tool to relieve the area around the broken stud. Or you will have a hole to big for the new stud.

    Reply
  8. Ken

    I don’t agree with beating the stud into place with the hammer, but since that’s what was done, a big mistake was beating on the drum with the exposed bearing. Likely there is enough scale on that drum to come loose and fly around the bearing. At least, put a rag over the bearing and seal when doing this procedure.

    Reply

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