CCRC LIVE! October 2019

Duration:

Managing Editor Mark Simpson and special guest Ross Kiehl spent an hour answering viewer questions regarding car repair, maintenance and restoration.

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6 Responses to “CCRC LIVE! October 2019”
    • Customer Service
      Customer Service

      HI Bill,

      Thank you for your patience while I reached out to the experts, here is the reply:

      There are several kits available to make the conversion to power disc brakes.
      Not to mention getting rid of the safety benefits of getting rid of the single reservoir master cylinder.

      You’ll need a new master and booster as well as a new brake pedal.
      The brake pedal on the Mustang is different between power brake and non-power brake cars.

      Here are a few sources to check out:
      https://www.mpbrakes.com/
      https://www.npdlink.com/
      https://www.classicindustries.com/
      https://www.cjponyparts.com/

      Wrench Safe,

      Mark
      Classic Car Restoration Club

      Reply
  1. Duker
    Duker

    I bought a older custom car, body work was done in 1952 on a fat fender car, some of the filled in seams are cracking through paint done by a stick welder…What to do? Should I use seam sealer to give it more support under all the panels that were welded ? This is on a 1942 Hudson w/a pancake hood, custom dash, rear fender seams filled in… thanks for your help…

    Reply
    • Customer Service
      Customer Service

      Hi David,

      Thank you for your patience while I got the answer form the experts, here is the reply:

      Great car and it’s cool it’s an older custom survivor, My first thought when reading your question was all of the filling on the seams and welds would have to be lead as plastic body fillers were not invented until later in the 50s and even then they didn’t become widely used until the mid-sixties. For the lead to start cracking so many years later it makes me wonder if the actual welds are failing? Are they rusted? Leaded seams don’t often seldom crack when done properly and have superior resistance to effects of water penetration. It’s also possible it was reworked at a later date and plastic body fillers were used.

      Seam sealers are used to prevent water from entering the welded areas from the backside, and will do little to add more support. If you do not want to mess with the paint or bodywork, using a product like Duraglass on the backside may add some rigidity and seal up the seams. If you want to restore and repaint the car, it would be well advised to clean out the molded seams, re-weld and re-fill them.

      Wrench Safe,

      Mark
      Classic Car Restoration Club

      Reply
  2. jim
    jim

    installing a 3/4 in. t&g oak in bed of my .68 c10. bed good on rust, has sprayed in liner . have planed boards sanding now. ?can i spray auto clear finish.

    Reply
    • Customer Service
      Customer Service

      Hello Jim,

      Thank you for contacting us. Great question! The ‘Ask an Expert’ section is currently for members of our online community. By becoming a member, you will have access to our expert’s knowledge in Car Restoration. With your membership you will also receive discounts on products and hours of Premium video content.

      If you are interested in becoming a member to Classic Car Restoration Club, please click on the special offer below:

      https://go.ClassicCarRestorationClub.com/c19142

      If you have any further questions on becoming a member, please chat, email, or contact Customer Service at 1-855-706-3534.

      We greatly appreciate your business!

      Sincerely,

      Joan
      Classic Car Restoration Club Video Membership

      Reply