Repairing and Straightening Stainless Trim

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Stainless trim is common to many cars from the 20s through the 70s; with a little effort it can be made to look like new again. Follow along as hot rod fabricator Gary Simpson demonstrates the processes of straightening stainless trim and polishing it to a high luster.

Discussion
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3 Responses to “Repairing and Straightening Stainless Trim”
  1. Howie Tyson

    For someone like me that doesn’t know the first thing about body work, but would like to learn, this is an extremely informative and very interesting video to watch. Thank you.

    Reply
  2. Thomas

    I’ve noticed on a few of your how-to videos you leave out detail. For example; on this video, you do not indicate what the buffing compounds are. I can understand if you are avoiding brand names for products, but you could mention that the first wheel is a spiral sewn wheel, using Tripoli compound. Then the second is a flannel sewn wheel with Stainless compound. The RPM of the buffer is also important. Guys might try to use a grinder to buff, which the RPM is too high. Also in this video, you spent more time showing the wheel being changed than the actual buffing. It looks like you are applying quite a bit of pressure of the piece into the wheel, you can comment how much pressure to apply, though it should not be a lot… let the wheel do the work. You want to make sure you wipe all of the compound off between wheels, also to prevent contaminating the 2nd wheel. You can apply a hand applied metal polish such as Flitz as well to help protect the surface.
    Thanks!
    Tom V

    Reply
  3. Rich

    Thank you very much – really well presented and informative. Excellent job with demonstrating the steps.

    Reply

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