Cleaning White Wall Tires

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Most classic car owners agree that keeping white wall tires looking bright white can be a challenge. Mark Simpson shares the process he uses when cleaning white wall tires to keep them looking like new on his rides.

Discussion
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7 Responses to “Cleaning White Wall Tires”
  1. Arthur French

    is he kidding There is bkeach in that and it yellows over time. Try biodegradable simple green. I would never use a bleach product because it is an oxidizer. Abrasives score the ruber. Who is this guy?

    Reply
    • Customer Service

      The great thing about working on cars is there is no shortage of opinions.

      Wrench Safe!

      Reply
    • Gary

      I agree — If you read up on whitewall cleaning — I’d never use this old school process on my $1,000 Corkers

      Reply
  2. Mel

    An easier and less expensive way to clean whitewalls and with what i consider better results , is to use LA’s TOTALY AWSOME AND Mr.Clean magic eraser ! The brown that was left around the rim area will be gone and the tire will look brighter!!!

    Reply
  3. Melvin

    LA’s totally awesome and mr clean magic eraser will do a better job than that ! You can get both for 2.00 at dollar tree.

    Reply
  4. Kevin

    Is he kidding? Spray whitewall cleaner on the entire tire, black part and all. Knowing the strength of your pressure washer, use it being careful not to damage the tire. Rinse the heck out of it. This is the part where is will actually rinse the black or discoloration out of it.

    If this does not not work, then I have wet sanded them with 1000 grit paper, being careful not to damage the detail of the white part if there is any. Then I follow up with another dose of whitewall cleaner. Tire dressing has a tendency to make the white part of the tire look dirty also. I do my best to only dress the black part because the dressing attracts dirt. I will admit, it is nearly impossible to only dress the black part of a whitelettered tire. I agree with the cleanser trick. I might try that next time before I go to the sandpaper. I have never scuffed up a whitewall with sandpaper or cleanser. I did one with a brass bristle brush, but that was only when I used the brass bristle brush every week on the car for two years. Come on? Use clean brushes and sandpaper of course.

    Reply

Tags: classic car cleaning, Mark Simpson, white wall tips, white wall tires